The 5 Most Tear-Jerking Moments From Glee‘s Cory Monteith Tribute Episode

On October 11, 2013, in Article, Celeb, eBooks, Entertainment, Movies, Music, Videos, by nadia

Within seconds of the opening strains of “Seasons of Love” the Twitterverse exploded with messages of condolences and support as Glee fans all over the globe said #farewellfinn during the highly anticipated (and dreaded) Cory Monteith tribute episode. In short, I cried

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Within seconds of the opening strains of “Seasons of Love” the Twitterverse exploded with messages of condolences and support as Glee fans all over the globe said #farewellfinn during the highly anticipated (and dreaded) Cory Monteith tribute episode. In short, I cried. A lot. And since I read on the internet that group therapy is beneficial, here are the five most moving moments from last night’s show. Get your shirt sleeve forearm tissues ready.

#5 Santana Sings The Band Perry’s “If I Die Young”

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Naya Rivera‘s soulful R&B styling of The Band Perry’s country hit was the tipping point of no return when it came to the waterworks. Santana’s breakdown during the middle of the track coupled with her physical reaction to her grief minutes before made for a pretty powerful solo. The lyrics “what I never did is done” never held so much meaning thinking back on Cory’s future potential as an actor.

#4 Rachel’s Heart-To-Heart With Mr. Schue

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Though this scene came during the final minutes, it was one of the most touching. Lea Michele pulls off a solid mix of real life reminiscing and Rachel Berry mourning the loss of one of the biggest components in her life plan. Turns out the plaque sequence you see in that scene really did make Lea smile. According to a recent interview she did with TV Guide Australia, Lea said Cory stole a plaque that used to reside on the famed Glee choir room set. They apparently spent the summer before his death traveling around taking pictures with it. But the line that really gets you killing trees is when Rachel clutches her Finn necklace and says, “He was my person.”

Source: The 5 Most Tear-Jerking Moments From Glee‘s Cory Monteith Tribute Episode

Mark Pellegrino Explains Lost, His One Direction Fandom And The Scary Tomorrow People

On October 9, 2013, in Article, Celeb, eBooks, Entertainment, Movies, Music, Videos, by nadia

View Photo Gallery We’re not going to say Mark Pellegrino is destined to play a villain. After all, Lost’s Jacob — one of an impressive number of TV characters he’s brought to life — turned out to be a mostly good guy. But his mere presence in the premiere of The Tomorrow People tonight on the CW (9 pm ET) lets us know that the heroes are in trouble


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We’re not going to say Mark Pellegrino is destined to play a villain. After all, Lost’s Jacob — one of an impressive number of TV characters he’s brought to life — turned out to be a mostly good guy. But his mere presence in the premiere of The Tomorrow People tonight on the CW (9 pm ET) lets us know that the heroes are in trouble. His Dr. Jedikiah Price is the leader of Ultra, an organization that is trying to find and neutralize the so-called “Tomorrow People” or homo superiors, a new species with powers of telekinesis, telepathy and teleportation. We recently spoke to Pellegrino, however, and he defended Jedikiah’s motives as pretty reasonable. He also managed to share his thoughts on his roles in Lost, Mulholland Drive, Supernatural and Doogie Howser M.D., and — brace yourselves — how he came to love Glee and One Direction.

VH1: Hi, Mark! So, I could just call your Tomorrow People character the villain, but do you have a better way to sum up Jedikiah for us?
Mark Pellegrino: I think he is a man devoted to the purpose of protecting the human race from the superior species that, in all of my research and studies, when in competition with an inferior species, not only defeats it but wipes it out.

VH1: Will we be able to relate to him too?
MP: I hope so. Especially in episodes 8 and 9, you see the more human side of Jedikiah. Jedikiah to me is a combination of scientist and politician. And what you see more in earlier episodes, especially the pilot episode, is the ruthlessness of a politician who has a grander vision of things than just this moment, an “ends justify the means” kind of animating philosophy. You see how much internal sacrifice he has had to make by the personal revelations that happen later on. It’s tough living for an ideal, and I think that’s what Jedikiah is living for.

VH1: Does the idea of a real life “homo superior” species scare you?
MP: It depends on the values of the person. If the person’s bad, yeah, they scare me because they can do quite a lot of things. Through the course of the show, you see breakouts that are mistaken as bad but aren’t. Some of them are doing bad things for noble reasons, because they’re on the fringes of society. And then you see really bad ones. You see people that are very scary. So you definitely get to see what it would be like if somebody with those kind of powers and horrible anti-life values were let loose in the world, and it’s frightening.

Source: Mark Pellegrino Explains Lost, His One Direction Fandom And The Scary Tomorrow People

Madonna on Motherhood, Being Sexually Assaulted

On October 4, 2013, in Celeb, by ayesha

Material Girl Madonna covers the November issue of Harper’s Bazaar.

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Material Girl Madonna covers the November issue of Harper’s Bazaar. In a cover story essay, the pop superstar, 55, opens up about the joys of motherhood to her four kids – Lourdes, 16, Rocco, 13, David, 8, and Mercy, 7 – and her traumatic experience of being raped in New York City.

On being sexually assaulted: “New York wasn’t everything I thought it would be. It did not welcome me with open arms. The first year, I was held up at gunpoint. Raped on the roof of a building I was dragged up to with a knife in my back, had my apartment broken into three times. I don’t know why; I had nothing of value after they took my radio the first time.”

On arriving into NYC: “It wasn’t anything I prepared for. Trying to be a professional dancer, paying my rent by posing nude for art classes, staring at people staring at me naked. Daring them to think of me as anything but a form they were trying to capture with their pencils and charcoal. I was defiant. Hell-bent on surviving. On making it. But it was hard and it was lonely, and I had to dare myself every day to keep going.”

On her teen years: “Most people thought I was strange. I didn’t have many friends; I might not have had any friends. But it all turned out good in the end, because when you aren’t popular and you don’t have a social life, it gives you more time to focus on your future. And for me, that was going to New York to become a REAL artist. To be able to express myself in a city of nonconformists. To revel and shimmy and shake in a world and be surrounded by daring people.”

On wanting motherhood: “At 35, I was divorced and looking for love in all the wrong places. I decided that I needed to be more than a girl with gold teeth and gangster boyfriends. More than a sexual provocateur imploring girls not to go for second-best baby. I began to search for meaning and a real sense of purpose in life. I wanted to be a mother.”

On adopting David: “This was an eye opening experience” and “a real low point in my life. I didn’t know that trying to adopt a child was going to land me in another sh– storm. I was accused of kidnapping, child trafficking, using my celebrity muscle to jump ahead in the line, bribing government officials, witchcraft, you name it. I could get my head around people giving me a hard time for simulating masturbation onstage or publishing my Sex book, even kissing Britney Spears at an awards show, but trying to save a child’s life was not something I thought I would be punished for. . . In any case, I got through it. I survived.”

On adopting Mercy: “When I adopted Mercy James, I put my armor on. I tried to be more prepared. I braced myself. This time I was accused by a female Malawian judge that because I was divorced, I was an unfit mother. I fought the supreme court and I won. It took almost another year and many lawyers. I still got the shit kicked out of me, but it didn’t hurt as much. And looking back, I do not regret one moment of the fight.”

On her life now: “Ten years later, here I am, divorced and living in New York. I have been blessed with four amazing children. I try to teach them to think outside the box. To be daring. To choose to do things because they are the right thing to do, not because everybody else is doing them. I have started making films, which is probably the most challenging and rewarding thing I have ever done. I am building schools for girls in Islamic countries and studying the Qur’an. I think it is important to study all the holy books. As my friend Yaman always tells me, a good Muslim is a good Jew, and a good Jew is a good Christian, and so forth. I couldn’t agree more. To some people this is a very daring thought.”

For more from Madonna, go to Harper’s Bazaar

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Photo credit: Harper’s Bazaar


Source: Madonna on Motherhood, Being Sexually Assaulted

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