Iranian lawmakers condemn protests; call for execution of leaders – CNN

On February 15, 2011, in Latest News, Videos, by admin

Tens of thousands of protesters marched through the Iranian capital, Tehran, on Monday in defiance of the government.

Tens of thousands of protesters marched through the Iranian capital, Tehran, on Monday in defiance of the government.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • NEW: Lawmakers call for execution of opposition leaders Mehdi Karrubi and Mir Hossein Moussavi
  • NEW: A European Union official urged Iran to “fully respect” rights of citizens
  • Protesters were out on the streets Monday and were largely cleared from the streets by Monday night

Tehran, Iran (CNN) — Iranian lawmakers denounced Monday’s protests in Tehran and called for the execution of two opposition leaders for inciting the demonstrations, Iran’s state-run Press TV reported Tuesday.

Members of the Iranian parliament issued fiery chants against opposition leaders and former presidential candidates Mehdi Karrubi and Mir Hossein Moussavi

Press TV aired video Tuesday of lawmakers chanting “Moussavi, Karroubi … execute them.”

Lawmakers also named former President Mohammad Khatami in some of the death chants.

Iranian leaders have praised Egypt’s revolution, but Monday when protesters in Iran took to the streets the government cracked down hard.

Last week, the Iranian government rounded up activists after Karrubi and Moussavi called for supporters to gather at Azadi Square — the site of mass protests by Iran’s opposition movement after the disputed 2009 presidential elections.

Despite the security crackdown, tens of thousands of demonstrators marched in Tehran Monday.

Patrolling security forces battled protesters with batons and tear gas for much of the day.

The large crowd was largely cleared from the city’s streets by nightfall and the main squares near Tehran University remained free of police, security forces or protesters

Dozens of demonstrators were detained during Monday’s protests while internet videos showed others had been chased and beaten.

One person was shot and killed during the protests, according to Iran’s semiofficial Fars news agency. Several others were injured and listed in serious condition as a result of the shooting, which the Iranian government blamed on “agitators and seditionists.”

Video uploaded to YouTube showed throngs of demonstrators marching, burning posters of Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and in one instance beating a man who appeared to try to remove a poster from the hands of protesters.

Other YouTube video showed police in riot gear pursuing dozens of people running away from the baton-wielding officers.

Other videos show similar protests going on in other cities in Iran such as Shiraz and Isfahan.

CNN cannot independently verify the authenticity of the videos and witnesses declined to be named for fear of retribution.

Reporting from Iran proved extremely difficult Monday — foreign journalists were denied visas, accredited journalists living in the country were restricted from covering the demonstrations and internet speeds slowed to a crawl in an apparent attempt to both limit protest organizing and restrict information from being transmitted out of the country.

Catherine Ashton, the European Union foreign policy chief, released a statement Tuesday urging Iranian officials to “fully respect and protect the rights of their citizens, including freedom of expression and the right to assemble peacefully.”

CNN’s Reza Sayah and Mitra Mobasherat contributed to this report


Continue reading here: Iranian lawmakers condemn protests; call for execution of leaders – CNN

Incoming search terms:

  • execution iran video
  • iranian lawmakers condemn protest cnn video

IBM’s Watson on Jeopardy: Round 1 ends in a tie – Los Angeles Times

On February 15, 2011, in Article, Entertainment, General, Latest News, Videos, by nadia

IBM’s Watson landed a tie in the first round of Jeopardy’s man-vs.-machine challenge Monday night. Watson, IBM’s supercomputer, and Brad Rutter each ended Day 1 with $5,000 in winnings, while Ken Jennings, the other human competitor, came out with $2,000. Jennings — who had previously won 74 consecutive Jeopardy matches — defeated Watson in the practice match between the three players leading up to the three-round faceoff

6a00d8341c630a53ef0147e28824b2970b-pi

IBM’s Watson landed a tie in the first round of Jeopardy’s man-vs.-machine challenge Monday night.

Watson, IBM’s supercomputer, and Brad Rutter each ended Day 1 with $5,000 in winnings, while Ken Jennings, the other human competitor, came out with $2,000.

Jennings — who had previously won 74 consecutive Jeopardy matches — defeated Watson in the practice match between the three players leading up to the three-round faceoff.

Round 2 is Tuesday night, and the final round airs Wednesday.

While Watson proved competitive, there were some missteps.

At one point during on Monday’s episode, Watson gave a wrong answer, saying “What is 1920s,” after Jennings had just given the same incorrect response.

Host Alex Trebek responded with “No, Ken already said that.”

Watson, named after IBM founder Thomas J. Watson, started off Monday’s episode in dominating fashion with $5,200 on the board by the first commercial break, while Rutter accumulated $1,000 and Jennings rung up $200.

The first night was a huge learning experience for the engineers who’ve spent years working on building Watson for this very match, said Steve Canepa, IBM’s general manager of global Media and the entertainment industry.

“I’ve seen a lot of the the videos we’ve put together about the making of Watson and things like that, but I hadn’t actually seen it in action until tonight,” Canepa said Monday after the first night of competition.

“When Watson repeated that answer, to the general public it was probably pretty funny. But Watson only takes his input from the question board so the fact that somebody else gave the same answer already doesn’t factor to into Watson says. He can’t hear what the other players are saying, but maybe that’s a feature we can add in the future.”

Offering the same response as Jennings also shows just how smart Watson is, he said.

“There is obviously some form of logic that was very similar to that of the human player tackling that problem, and that is fascinating to me,” Canepa said. “The ability to sort through what is a couple hundred million pages of information in a very short amount of time, all the data that we create in blogs and tweets and articles and all of that unstructured text on the Internet — to be able to find the relationship between words so quickly is what the point of all this is.”

All the data stored in Watson is aquired from the Internet, though for competition, Watson is disconneted from the Web, he said.

IBM is looking to change the way computers, and people, search and learn using computers, Canepa said, and Watson is searching information as humans create it, not just by data put into rows and columns as has been done before.

“We’ll see what happens over the next two nights, but I’m not overly focused on the win or loss myself,” he said. “In Chess, as finite as it is, there’s a finite number of moves. But in this there are an infinite number of questions that can be asked and with all the puns and ways there are to ask a question.

“I’m really focused on the many real-life situations for this ability to be able to dive into unstructured data and make sense of it. The kind of search we do on a search engine today is much more keyword oriented and this is way beyond that … If we can search with intelligence, it could open up all sorts of new fields and possibilities.”

RELATED:

‘Jeopardy!’: A singular moment, or the onset of singularity?

IBM computer named Watson will battle ‘Jeopardy’ champs for $1 million

— Nathan Olivarez-Giles

twitter.com/nateog

Photo: Alex Trebek, Ken Jennings, IBM’s Watson, and Brad Rutter. Credit: Associated Press.

Continue reading here: IBM’s Watson on Jeopardy: Round 1 ends in a tie – Los Angeles Times

Incoming search terms:

  • ibm watson cute or too cute

Clinton praises Iran protesters – BBC News

On February 15, 2011, in Latest News, Videos, by admin

14 February 2011 Last updated at 19:56 ET Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play. Footage of the protests in Tehran was captured on mobile phones US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has expressed her firm support for the thousands of opposition supporters who protested in Iran’s capital on Monday.


14 February 2011
Last updated at 19:56 ET


Protests in Tehran

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.

Footage of the protests in Tehran was captured on mobile phones

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has expressed her firm support for the thousands of opposition supporters who protested in Iran’s capital on Monday.

Mrs Clinton said they deserved to have “the same rights that they saw being played out in Egypt” and that Iran had to “open up” its political system.

One person was reportedly shot dead in the violent clashes between protesters and security forces in central Tehran.

Dozens were detained, and opposition leaders were placed under house arrest.

The BBC received reports of banned demonstrations in other Iranian cities, including Isfahan, Mashhad and Shiraz.

‘Hypocrisy’

In their first major show of dissent December 2009, when eight people were killed, thousands of opposition supporters gathered at Tehran’s Azadi Square on Monday in solidarity with the popular uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt.

They chanted: “Death to dictators”.

Continue reading the main story

At the scene

Riding on the back of a motorbike, holding my mobile to take video footage, I went to central Tehran on Monday afternoon. My driver skilfully found back alleys to reach Azadi (Freedom) Square, the Iranian counterpart of Egypt’s Tahrir Square.

Thousands of people made their way amicably and silently towards the square, most of them young. Many wore trainers, suggesting they were anticipating having to run away from the security forces to escape arrest.

Riot police began to disperse the crowd before they even started the rally. Men on motorbikes belonging to the police and Republican Guards charged the protesters and beat them severely with batons. However, this merely emboldened them.

When the troops fired tear gas at the crowd, it became very difficult to breathe. Some girls and women fainted. Many of the protesters were also detained. Others set rubbish bins on fire to combat the effects of the gas.

My driver was hit by a paintball fired by a policeman and lightly injured, but he was still able to drive me back to the office. Once there, I was shocked to see that official and semi-official news agencies were saying everything was normal when for a couple of hours, there had been total chaos.

But the BBC’s Mohsen Asgari, who was at the rally, says it was not long before riot police fired tear gas, while men on motorbikes charged the crowd with batons.

Witnesses told the Associated Press new agency that at least three protesters had been wounded by bullets, with dozens of others taken to hospital as a result of the beatings.

Iran’s semi-official Fars news agency meanwhile reported that one person was shot dead by protesters and several others wounded.

Opposition websites said hundreds of people were arrested. There has been no official confirmation.

As night fell, hundreds of riot police remained on the streets of the capital.

Later in Washington, Mrs Clinton told reporters that the US administration “very clearly and directly” supports the protesters.

“What we see happening in Iran today is a testament to the courage of the Iranian people, and an indictment of the hypocrisy of the Iranian regime – a regime which over the last three weeks has constantly hailed what went on in Egypt,” she said.

Mrs Clinton said the US had the same message for the Iranian authorities as it did for those in Egypt, where President Hosni Mubarak was forced to step down after 29 years in power by nationwide mass protests.

“We are against violence and we would call to account the Iranian government that is once again using its security forces and resorting to violence to prevent the free expression of ideas from their own people,” she said.

“We think that there needs to be a commitment to open up the political system in Iran, to hear the voices of the opposition and civil society,” she added.

Earlier on Monday, police placed the opposition leader, Mir Hossein Mousavi, under house arrest and blocked access to his home.

His website said they intended to prevent the former prime minister attending the Tehran rally.

Fellow opposition leader Mehdi Karroubi, a former speaker of parliament and a senior cleric, is also reportedly being held under house arrest.

Both men disputed the re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009, which triggered protests that drew the largest crowds in Iran since the Islamic Revolution in 1979. The authorities responded by launching a brutal crackdown.

The opposition says more than 80 of its supporters were killed over the following six months, a figure the government disputes. Several have been sentenced to death, and dozens jailed.

Although Iran’s establishment supported the Egyptian and Tunisian protests, describing them as an “Islamic awakening” inspired by the Islamic Revolution, it said the opposition rallies were a “political move”.

Send your pictures and videos to [email protected] or text them to 61124 (UK) or +44 7725 100 100 (International). If you have a large file you can upload here.

Read the terms and conditions

Continue reading here: Clinton praises Iran protesters – BBC News

Page 603 of 607« First...102030...601602603604605...Last »
Premium WordPress Themes